Md. Historical Society Photographs

Starting in circa 1850, the Maryland Historical Society (MdHS) photographic collection contains well over one million items including daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, cartes-de-visite, albumen prints, salted paper prints, acetate negatives, and more. Photographs are part of MdHS's Special Collections Department, H. Furlong Baldwin Library.

Digital reproductions of originals are property of MdHS. For image reproduction and permission info: MdHS Imaging Services.

Feel free to share these images with proper citation.

jferretti@mdhs.org

Curated by Jennifer A. Ferretti (former Curator of Photographs, MdHS). I am not an MdHS employee and in no way represent the institution. All views are my own.

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Eastern Avenue Looking West from the East Side of 15th Street Showing Progress of WorkBaltimore, MarylandSeptember 17, 1915Photographer unknownBaltimore Sewerage and State Roads Commission Collection, Maryland Historical SocietyPP165.125
In 1906, the state of Maryland prohibited Baltimore from discharging sewage into the Chesapeake Bay or any of its tributaries, and provided $10,000,000 for a sewerage system, with a matching amount for the project coming from the city on a bond issue. Under Mayor Edwin Clay Timanus, the city began construction of the sewer system, and the project was continued by Mayors J. Barry Mahool and James Harry Preston. At the same time, development of Baltimore’s infrastructure of streets and railroads continued with the creation of the Paving Commission in 1911.

Eastern Avenue Looking West from the East Side of 15th Street Showing Progress of Work
Baltimore, Maryland
September 17, 1915
Photographer unknown
Baltimore Sewerage and State Roads Commission Collection,
Maryland Historical Society
PP165.125

In 1906, the state of Maryland prohibited Baltimore from discharging sewage into the Chesapeake Bay or any of its tributaries, and provided $10,000,000 for a sewerage system, with a matching amount for the project coming from the city on a bond issue. Under Mayor Edwin Clay Timanus, the city began construction of the sewer system, and the project was continued by Mayors J. Barry Mahool and James Harry Preston. At the same time, development of Baltimore’s infrastructure of streets and railroads continued with the creation of the Paving Commission in 1911.

Notes

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